Category Archives: insurance - Page 2

Why General Liability Insurance for Business Is a Must

Businesses are more prone into law troubles – both the serious and the frivolous kind. There are many unpredictable things that can occur in the course of running a business. This is why it is important to invest in a good general liability insurance that can cover your business in all such legal troubles without causing you financial loss or unnecessary issues.

You can get a general liability insurance policy for all kinds of businesses – be it a community store, major corporation, or even an online business. When you start a venture, you are in charge of the profit, and your employees depend upon you. This means it is very important for you to have your business properly protected not just for your benefit but also for the people who are counting on you for income to support their families.

A general liability insurance thus safeguards you from unpredictable flaws that may lead to legal proceedings. To ensure timely benefits from your policy, you must keep all insurance papers in place and you should also fully understand your rights under your general liability insurance.

Getting a general liability insurance can also be the legal provision in many states to start your business. So before commencing a new business, it is important for you to check with all the local laws to see that you meet the necessary insurance terms. After this has been done, speak to the insurance agent of a reputed company and get a prolonged general liability insurance policy that can get you good coverage at low premiums for the future.

Below is the list of five common legal risks faced by several businesses:

#1 Legal structure: While setting up a business you need a legal structure that comes in a variety of choices. Each choice of the legal structure varies in terms of taxation, documentation, liability, etc. Moreover, the legal structure of a business also determines how the management and operations decisions are to be made. Which is why it is important to understand the benefits and drawbacks of each legal choice. Also, you should be knowledgeable about the structure you have chosen. Any mistake in the legal structure might lead to legal troubles.

#2 Employment law: Employment law cases involving unjust termination and discrimination claims are on the rise. These laws are broad, complex and change frequently. Thus to save you from getting into unnecessary haggles it is important to know and understand the common employment law risks and have a complete employee manual that is followed conscientiously by management.

#3 Security laws: To increase the capital for your business you may take money from investors, and in return they get some type of claim on the ownership or profits of your company. State and central government agencies closely monitor this process, and those who fail to follow the securities laws will have to pay hefty penalties.

#4 Partnership and Succession risks: Business partnerships are common and so is the stories of many such relationships turning sour. In case of an accident, death, disability or other circumstances are nearly unavoidable in the long run. Therefore, It is important for you to plan ahead of times while getting into a business partnership so as to avoid future risks.

#5 Contract risk: Contracts are fundamental agreements that define the relationships between your company and its partners, customers and suppliers, etc. Whether your company outlines the contract or simply executes them, not knowing, understanding or agreeing with the contract terms can result in disputes or even other financial troubles. Moreover, operating on a “communicative” deal with no written terms can result in unmet expectations and costly lawsuits. The best practice is to get all your agreements done in writing well in advance.

The Importance Of Adequate Insurance Cover To Small Businesses

One of the largest risks facing small business owners is a failure to ensure an adequate level of insurance cover for their company – this is particularly true of small businesses who may not quite have the resources to cope with the large financial losses which may be suffered as a result of ‘underinsurance’.

A UK study recently estimated that around 80% of businesses may actually be underinsured, and this figure is only likely to rise given the unprecedented volume of new businesses which are forming by the day in the UK.

As commercial insurance can be a somewhat dry and complicated topic, it is often overlooked by business owners eager to focus their efforts on lead generation, sales, customer service and production.

This is an understandable, yet extremely dangerous view to take, particularly in the modern era.

Unfortunately, claiming that you were ‘unaware’ that you lacked the correct insurance cover will rarely stand up in a court of law, and you must therefore take the time to ensure you are knowledgeable of exactly what is included in your business insurance policy, and what has been omitted.

This needs to be undertaken on a regular basis.

Never take the risk of waiting for a major financial loss before inspecting your insurance cover – instead, analyze your business insurance carefully, and determine whether you currently hold the correct level of coverage, in relation to the risks that are present in your individual business or industry.

Underinsurance is quite a basic concept – it simply means that your insurance schedule is valued lower than the sum of your company’s total assets, and you risk receiving less money in compensation than you require to restore your business to any pre-loss standing it may have held.

The primary reason for inadequate coverage among business owners is complacency – the feeling that ‘it will never happen to me’. However, this is demonstrably untrue, and this school of thought has led to many closed businesses, and a vast amount of unemployed entrepreneurs.

As well as ensuring an adequate level of coverage, it is also important that you update your business insurance accurately, on a yearly basis at the minimum.

The assets of a business can increase or decrease in value on a regular basis, particularly during uncertain economic times, and it is vital that your insurance schedule reflects the health of your business as it currently stands, and not as it stood twelve months ago or longer.

Take the time to undertake a full evaluation of your assets on a yearly basis before renewing your business easily avoided.

Businesses can be inadequately covered for many reasons, but it is important that you immediately examine your current level of coverage, understand the risks involved by remaining underinsured, and make the necessary changes to your business insurance, to ensure you minimize the risks involved with potential underinsurance.

It is often common for businesses to be inadequately covered on any commercial insurance policy, but UK insurers claim that the following policies are the most frequently underinsured – Property Insurance, Business Interruption Insurance, and Cyber Liability Insurance.

The good news is that you can take many immediate steps to ensure that your business is sufficiently covered for any potential eventuality which may occur.

Common ways of achieving this include undertaking regular valuations of all your business assets, consider the effect of inflation when initially taking out your cover, calculating a suitable indemnity period which will allow your business sufficient time to recover from any financial loss or shortfall, and reviewing your business insurance policy on a regular basis (preferably with legal insight), to ensure that your company is covered in the broadest possible sense.

Never underestimate just how important the correct level of insurance coverage is to your business.

You should be doing everything in your power to ensure that your company is adequately protected at all times, and ensuring sufficient insurance coverage is undoubtedly one of the largest measures you can take to achieving this – it is the foundation upon which all of your other business dealings should be built.

Ross Leese is the owner of RAL Digital – a creator and distributor of high-quality information products, in the form of eBooks, short reports and article packages.

5 Types of Business Insurance and Why You Need Them

No matter the size or nature of your business, one thing that remains the same is the need for business insurance. There are many different aspects of your business that you’ll want to take into consideration when looking for new business insurance – or reviewing your current insurance coverage. Since every business is different, each one will have different insurance requirements. For example, a company that produces physical goods may need different insurance than a company which offers services. In either scenario, there are some similarities, and listed here are a few types of insurance that all businesses should consider.

Workers’ Compensation Insurance – for your employees

Workers’ Comp insurance is required by law in almost every state. It can provide coverage for medical costs and a portion of lost wages for an employee who becomes injured or ill on the job. Typically, this type of insurance only covers injuries or illness that occur on the job site – for example, if an employee slips and falls on a wet floor.

Since the laws regarding Workers’ Comp can be different depending on where your company is located, it’s important to work with an insurance professional to make sure you’re getting the coverage that’s required, as well as what you need for your particular business.

General Liability Insurance

General Liability Insurance is designed to protect you and your business from a variety of claims, including accidents, injuries, or claims of negligence. This type of insurance can help pay for things like property damage, medical expenses, libel, slander, legal costs, and faulty products. No one expects to get sued, but the reality is that it’s always a possibility. You don’t want to leave your business open to these types of situations, and the broader the protection, the better.

Professional Liability Insurance – “Errors and Omissions” coverage

Professional Liability Insurance can also be known as “Errors and Omissions Insurance,” or “Malpractice Insurance.” It protects you from lawsuits that allege negligence in providing professional services, providing shoddy work, or making mistakes or omissions. This type of insurance is particularly important if you have a service-based business, but can also be necessary for other types of businesses as well. Mistakes happen – so adequate Professional Liability Insurance can be helpful, even if you don’t think you’ll need it.

Property Insurance

The definition of “property” is broad, and can mean different things to different types of businesses. That’s why it’s important to make sure you carry adequate Commercial Property Insurance. Without this type of insurance, most small businesses wouldn’t be able to replace their equipment should something happen to cause damage or destruction. Property covered by this type of insurance can include buildings, computers, inventory, supplies and equipment. There are two types of Property Insurance: “all-risk” policies cover just about everything, and is a good way to avoid duplication or overlap of coverage, as well as gaps in trying to cover your liabilities. “Peril-specific” policies, or “named-peril” coverage applies only to particular perils that are specifically named in the policy. They’re usually needed when there is a high risk in a very particular area.

Life Insurance / Key Executive Insurance – protection and benefit

Offering life insurance for employees can be a valuable benefit when trying to attract high-quality employees. A business can even offer additional coverage for executives. These employees are deemed to be crucial to the running and success of the business, and may sometimes require additional insurance, above and beyond what the normal employee benefits provide. This can be another benefit in attracting top talent.

A business can also offer special “Key Person” policies for employees without whom the business could not function. Key Person Insurance protects against a key employee’s unexpected death – often times the benefit amount equals the expected revenue loss and costs required to find and train a suitable replacement. The business pays the premiums, and the insurance is considered a business asset.

It’s possible to combine some of these basic coverages as a package policy, often referred to as a Business Owner’s Policy, or BOP. Many insurance companies bundle certain coverages, and this can save you money, as long as you make sure you get the proper type of coverage.

Even if you feel you have adequate business insurance coverage that meets all your current needs, it’s still advisable to review all your coverage on an annual basis, to make sure that your coverage continues to provide everything that you need. This is particularly important if you or your business have experienced any major changes, such as change in family status, or a significant increase or decrease in business activity. Additionally, be sure to work with a reputable, licensed insurance agent or broker, who has knowledge regarding business like yours.